1st Edition

Inquiry-based Science Education




ISBN 9780367279233
Published February 11, 2020 by CRC Press
116 Pages 10 B/W Illustrations

USD $65.00

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Book Description

Students often think of science as disconnected pieces of information rather than a narrative that challenges their thinking, requires them to develop evidence-based explanations for the phenomena under investigation, and communicate their ideas in discipline-specific language as to why certain solutions to a problem work. The author provides teachers in primary and junior secondary school with different evidence-based strategies they can use to teach inquiry science in their classrooms. The research and theoretical perspectives that underpin the strategies are discussed as are examples of how different ones areimplemented in science classrooms to affect student engagement and learning.

Key Features:

  • Presents processes involved in teaching inquiry-based science

  • Discusses importance of multi-modal representations in teaching inquiry based-science

  • Covers ways to develop scientifically literacy

  • Uses the Structure of Observed learning Outcomes (SOLO) Taxonomy to assess student reasoning, problem-solving and learning

  • Presents ways to promote scientific discourse, including teacher-student interactions, student-student interactions, and meta-cognitive thinking

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Inquiry-based science

 BACKGROUND

INQUIRY-BASED SCIENCE

USING INQUIRY-BASED SCIENCE TO CHALLENGE THINKING

Cooperative Learning Activities

Strategies to help students learn to work cooperatively together

Group size

Group composition.

Type of task

Individual reflection activity

Group’s Action Plan

Characteristics of Complex Tasks

CHALLENGES IMPLEMENTING INQUIRY-BASED SCIENCE

CHAPTER SUMMARY

ADDITIONAL READINGS

 

Chapter 2: Visual, embodied and language representations in teaching inquiry based-science: A case study

 INTRODUCTION

TYPES OF REPRESENTATIONS

Purpose of the case study

METHOD

Context for the study

Inquiry-based science unit

Data collection

Teacher measures

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

 

The inquiry-based science lessons

Lesson 1: Engage  

Lesson 2: Explore

Lesson 3: Explain

Lesson 4: Elaborate

Lesson 5: Evaluate

 

CHAPTER SUMMARY

ADDITIONAL READINGS

 

 Chapter 3: Developing scientific literacy

 INTRODUCTION

BACKGROUND

SCIENTIFIC LITERACY

Questions that challenge children’s understandings

Question Stems and Cognitive Processes

The discourse of science

Encouraging audience participation

Linguistic Tools that promote student discussion

Accountable Talk

Exploratory Talk

            Philosophy for Children (P4C)

 

CHAPTER SUMMARY

ADDITIONAL READINGS

 

Chapter 4: Promoting scientific discourse

 INTRODUCTION

DIALOGIC TEACHING

Example of Dialogic Teaching

Dialogic interactions in a cooperative group setting

STRATEGIES TO PROMOTE DIALOGIC INTERACTIONS

DIALOGIC STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS

Critical Thinking Skills

CHAPTER SUMMARY

ADDITIONAL READINGS

 

Chapter 5: Structuring cooperative learning to promote social and academic learning

 INTRODUCTION

COOPERATIVE LEARNING

BENEFITS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING

Advantages of small, cooperative group instruction

Types of cooperative learning groups

KEY ELEMENTS IN COOPERATIVE LEARNING

Skills that Facilitate Interpersonal Communication

 

STRATEGIES FOR CONSTRUCTING COOPERATION IN GROUPS

STRATEGIES FOR ASSESSING COOPERATIVE LEARNING

CHAPTER SUMMARY

ADDITIONAL READINGS

 

Chapter 6: The Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) Taxonomy: Assessing students’ reasoning, problem-solving and learning

 INTRODUCTION

THE SOLO TAXONOMY

FIVE LEVELS OF THE SOLO TAXONOMY

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Examples of the increasing complexity in students’ language: Using the SOLO Taxonomy

 

CHAPTER SUMMARY

ADDITIONAL READINGS

 

 

 

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Author(s)

Biography

Professor Robyn Gillies has worked extensively in both primary and secondary schools to embed STEM education initiatives into the science curriculum. This includes helping teachers to embed inquiry skills into the science curricula so they capture students’ interests, provide opportunities for them to explore possible solutions to problems, explain phenomena, elaborate on potential outcomes, and evaluate findings. Professor Gillies is a Chief Investigator on the Science of Learning Research Centre (SLRC), her recommendations on how teachers can translate research into practice have been widely profiled in the international literature and on the website of the Smithsonian Science Education Center in Washington, DC.